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Pre/Post Conference

WSA1 Workshop One

9 am–12 noon; (3 CE & 3 NBCC Clock Hours);
Audience Level:  All Levels

What Do I Do Inside My Head?
Using the Image of Two Screens to Apply Mindfulness Principles

PRESENTER
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Drs. Melissa and Scott Symington are clinical psychologists in private practice in Pasadena, California.

SUMMARY

The Two-Screen Method, developed by our presenters, uses the image of two screens to help clients apply mindfulness principles so they can diffuse anxiety, depressed moods and destructive urges. The presenters will demonstrate, through theory and clinical examples, how the two-screen image is an effective and user-friendly application of mindfulness-based interventions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Summarize the benefits/challenges of mindfulness-based interventions and the need for a user-friendly application of mindfulness.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Describe and apply the Two-Screen Method in the treatment and counseling of clients with anxiety, negative mood states and destructive urges..

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Explain how the Two-Screen Method addresses the core therapeutic tasks in the treatment of anxiety, negative mood states and destructive urges.


WSA2 Workshop Two

9 am–12 noon; (3 CE & 3 NBCC Clock Hours);
Audience Level:  Introductory

Anticipating Countertransference: A Tool for Managing Clinician Burnout

PRESENTER
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Dr. Jeff Terrell is the Dean of the College of Education & Human Services & Professor of Counseling Psychology at John Brown University in Siloam Springs, Arkansas.

SUMMARY

Clinicians attending this workshop will recognize and predict their own feeling states when working with various personality styles and disorders. Increased awareness will reduce stress and prevent burnout in therapy. The workshop will include a review of basic character styles, followed by role-plays and small group discussions of countertransference experiences.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Summarize the six most common character styles and the typical countertransference reactions to each.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Describe how clients in counseling and therapy benefit from knowing and applying these character styles and countertransference reactions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Describe your personal countertransference to each major character style and create a plan for managing the two most intense reactions.


WSA3 Workshop Three

9 am–12 noon; (3 CE);
Audience Level:  Introductory

Spiritual Formation as a Dimension of Culture and Training in Christian Doctoral Psychology Programs

PRESENTER
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Dr. Mark McMinn is a Professor of Psychology and Director of Integration in the Graduate Department of Psychology at George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon. Brian Goetsch is a PhD-candidate at George Fox University. Dr. Jeff Jennings is an Assistant Professor in the School of Psychology & Counseling at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Dr. Theresa Tisdale is a Professor in the Department of Graduate Psychology at Azusa Pacific University in Glendora, California. Dr. Brad Strawn is the Evelyn and Frank Freed Professor of Integration of Psychology and Theology in the School of Psychology, Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. Dr. Jana Pressley is the Director of Clinical Training and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at Wheaton College Graduate School in Wheaton, Illinois.

SUMMARY

Faculty members and doctoral students from six different explicitly Christian APA-accredited programs discuss how spiritual formation takes place within the training curriculum in psychology. This involves both cultural awareness as students within intentional training communities learn to understand their own spiritual development and theological tradition in relation to others who may be similar or different, and also character development as students gain knowledge, skills, and attitudes about ethical and efficacious ways of responding to spirituality in a range of settings.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Discuss the importance of spiritual and theological self-awareness in clinical and counseling psychology doctoral training.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Describe various strategies used by explicitly Christian doctoral programs to promote spiritual and theological self-awareness and formation among students.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Discuss how to help shape the dialog leading to further sharpening of training in spiritual awareness and formation among psychologists in both Christian and non-Christian programs.


WSA4 Workshop Four

9 am–12 noon; (3 CE & 3 NBCC Clock Hours);
Audience Level:  All Levels

Beyond Negative Emotions: Helping Marital Partners Find the Neurological Beauty in Holding Every Thought Captive

PRESENTER
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Dr. Fred DiBlasio is a clinical social worker and Professor of Social Work at the University of Maryland.  Dr. Charles Hester is a board certified chiropractor in private practice in Maryland.

SUMMARY

Often clinicians are faced with helping couples resolve difficult emotional situations, yet seldom is treatment based on helping clients understand and gain control over the emotional brain. This workshop will explain the latest advances in neuroscience of emotions in user-friendly terms that can be discussed with clients and provide treatment strategies that promote emotional self-control in times of conflict.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Identify user-friendly terms for the neurological structures & functions involved in emotional responses in relationships.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Identify how neuroplasticity operates to form new neuropathways.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Discuss various treatment strategies that are effective in helping couples build positive neuropathways for relational conflict.


WSA5 Workshop Five

8 am–1 pm; (5 CE & 5 NBCC Clock Hours);
Audience Level:  All Levels

Relational Psychoanalytic Perspectives in Couples Psychotherapy

PRESENTER
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Dr. Lowell Hoffman is the co-founder of SEPTT; he is a psychologist and psychoanalyst in private practice in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Dr. Earl Bland is a psychologist and Professor of Psychology & Dean of the School of Behavioral Sciences and Counseling at Mid-America Nazarene University in Olathe, Kansas.

SUMMARY

Therapists micro-manage couple`s emotions when they cannot conceptualize how to work with the couple`s anxieties. Therapists lose empathy and curiosity when overwhelmed by the couple`s dynamics. This seminar focuses on treating the couple as an unconscious/conscious system which responds best to a treatment informed by an understanding of intrapsychic/interpersonal relating.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Describe the partners` dispositions toward mutual negation and potential for mutual recognition.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Discuss the appropriate and inappropriate uses of therapist`s self-disclosure.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Explain the actualization of self-experience in an intimate relationship.


WSA6 Workshop Six

2:00–5:00 pm; (3 CE & 3 NBCC Clock Hours);
Audience Level:  All Levels

Relational Psychoanalytic Perspectives in Couples Psychotherapy

PRESENTER
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Dr. Phil Ringstrom is a training and supervising analyst at the Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles, California; his private practice is in Encino, California

SUMMARY

The workshop will highlight aspects of a relational psychoanalytic approach to couples therapy. The presentation will involve the illumination of three theoretical themes, i.e., self-actualization in an intimate relationship, mutual recognition, and the relationship having a mind of its own illustrated, in six clinical steps. Advantages and limitations of using this perspective, along with clinical examples, will be discussed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Describe how the three organizing themes: self-actualization in an intimate relationship, mutual recognition, and the relationship having a mind of its own; bridge important elements of contemporary psychoanalysis.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Explain how these three themes are practiced in terms of the model’s six steps.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Demonstrate modifications in psychoanalytic technique in conjoint therapy in light of this perspective shift.


WSA7 Workshop Seven

2:00–5:00 pm; (3 CE & 3 NBCC Clock Hours);
Audience Level: Intermediate-Advanced

Applications of Moral Foundations Theory within a Hermeneutical Ethical-Decision Model

PRESENTER
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Dr. Charles Romig is a Professor of Graduate Counseling at John Brown University in Siloam Springs, Arkansas. Dr. Virginia Holeman is a Professor of Counseling at Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky

SUMMARY

A hermeneutical model of ethical decision-making is more inclusive of the moral diversity found across cultures. Participants will learn how to integrate moral psychology and psychological anthropology into ethical decision-making in a way to enhance their multicultural competency, particularly when facing values conflicts with clients. Several case conceptualizations will be discussed by participants.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Articulate the key differences between Kitchener’s ethical decision-making model based on principle ethics and a hermeneutical ethical decision-making model.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Summarize the six moral foundations of Haidt’s moral foundations theory.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Utilize a hermeneutical ethical decision-making process that implements all six of Haidt`s moral foundations.


WSA8 Workshop Eight

2:00–5:00 pm; (3 CE & 3 NBCC Clock Hours);
Audience Level:  Intermediate-Advanced

The Good Clinician: Providing Ethical (and Compassionate) Care in Changing Times

PRESENTER
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Dr. Randolph Sanders is a clinical psychologist in private practice in New Braunfels, Texas; he is a former Executive Director of CAPS

SUMMARY

Participants in this workshop will learn about some of the latest issues relevant to the ethical practice of psychotherapy. We will consider current views about when a client becomes a client, and what to do when the values of client and therapist differ markedly. We look at recent concerns about the privacy of Psychotherapy Notes. We explore different ways to handle confidentiality when an individual client’s family may need or request information about the client. We review the guidelines of professional associations regarding the use of electronic modalities in therapy. We consider recent research that reveals methods that increase the probability that people will behave ethically.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Describe critically some different ways to handle requests for information from families of clients.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Explain arguments for and against referring clients when there are marked value differences between client and therapist.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Describe one way in which third parties can gain access to Psychotherapy Notes.


WSA9 Workshop Nine

2:00–5:00 pm; (3 CE & 3 NBCC Clock Hours);
Audience Level: All Levels

Creating Close, Connected Couples` Communication and Constructive Conflict Confrontation

PRESENTER
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Dr. Jared Pingleton is a clinical psychologist and serves as the Director of Counseling Services at Focus on the Family in Colorado Springs, Colorado

SUMMARY

Unless they have such a superficial relationship they never get close enough to experience friction, all marriages have conflict. This workshop provides a unique, innovative method to help couples understand one another deeply and offers a family friendly formula for fighting fair.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1

Describe and clinically apply the components of an innovative 6-stage process model for enhancing couples` intimacy and overall communication.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2

Summarize 10 guidelines which each member of the couple dyad can utilize to promote safety in their communication and conflict resolution process.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3

Compile and analyze 12 concepts involved in how couples can constructively communicate and resolve conflict.


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